Homeecolotop tray_trash
reuse outdoor garbage cans reuse Recycle bin recycling aluminium lid for trash receptacles reusing trash can reuse trash can waste bins lids waste management conservation of trash bins prolong the life of waste can recycling garbage containers lids
separate collection
reuse trash receptacle
garbage and recycle container lids
garbage and recycle bins lid
environmentally-friendly
extend the life of trash container

Tray trash


conservation of garbage receptacles prolong the life of trash cans  lid for wastebasket extend the life of outdoor garbage bin recycling garbage container lid lid for container recycle garbage container lids lid for outdoor garbage receptacles garbage and recycle container garbage and recycle container compost can extend the life of outdoor garbage receptacle

Economist Steven Landsburg has suggested that the sole benefit of reducing landfill space is trumped by the energy needed and resulting pollution from the recycling process. Others, however, have calculated through life cycle assessment that producing recycled paper uses less energy and water than harvesting, pulping, processing, and transporting virgin trees. When less recycled paper is used, additional energy is needed to create and maintain farmed forests until these forests are as self-sustainable as virgin forests.

The amount of energy saved through recycling depends upon the material being recycled and the type of energy accounting that is used. Emergy (spelled with an m) analysis, for example, budgets for the amount of energy of one kind (exergy) that is required to make or transform things into another kind of product or service. Using emergy life-cycle analysis researchers have concluded that materials with large refining costs have the greatest potential for high recycle benefits. Moreover, the highest emergy efficiency accrues from systems geared toward material recycling, where materials are engineered to recycle back into their original form and purpose, followed by adaptive reuse systems where the materials are recycled into a different kind of product, and then by by-product reuse systems where parts of the products are used to make an entirely different product.

Beverage bottles were recycled with a refundable deposit at some drink manufacturers in Great Britain and Ireland around 1800, notably Schweppes. An official recycling system with refundable deposits was established in Sweden for bottles in 1884 and aluminium beverage cans in 1982, by law, leading to a recycling rate for beverage containers of 84–99 percent depending on type, and average use of a glass bottle is over 20 refills.

 

In the past terrorists have left bombs in bins. The bomb is much less likely to be spotted than an unattended bag and the metal bins provide extra shrapnel that injures people nearby when it detonates. For this reason there are no bins in most railway stations, most airports and many shopping centres in the world, or if they are provided they are just a bin bag hanging from a metal hoop.

Home | History | Product Concept | Benefits | Target Market | Characteristics | Specifications
Clients | Distributors | Products |  Contact Us | Grants | News | Site Plan | Français