Homeecolotop industrial_waste
garbage and recycling bins extend the life of trash can prolong the life of trash containers reuse waste receptacle outdoor garbage receptacle lid for garbage and recycle cans wastebaskets garbage and recycling bin lids prolong the life of garbage containers container conservation of trash receptacle  reuse waste receptacles
garbage receptacle
reuse garbage cans
compostable material collection
recycling garbage bins
environmental
HDPE

Industrial waste


lid for recycling can garbage and recycle bin recyclable plastics collection recycling container lids composting bin conservation of wastebaskets garbage and recycling receptacles lids recycle container lids extend the life of garbage receptacles reusing trash cans prolong the life of garbage can bins

For a recycling program to work, having a large, stable supply of recyclable material is crucial. Three legislative options have been used to create such a supply: mandatory recycling collection, container deposit legislation, and refuse bans. Mandatory collection laws set recycling targets for cities to aim for, usually in the form that a certain percentage of a material must be diverted from the city's waste stream by a target date. The city is then responsible for working to meet this target.

Some industries, like the renewable energy industry and solar photovoltaic technology in particular, are being proactive in setting up recycling policies even before there is considerable volume to their waste streams, anticipating future demand during their rapid growth.

However, comparing the market cost of recyclable material with the cost of new raw materials ignores economic externalities—the costs that are currently not counted by the market. Creating a new piece of plastic, for instance, may cause more pollution and be less sustainable than recycling a similar piece of plastic, but these factors will not be counted in market cost. A life cycle assessment can be used to determine the levels of externalities and decide whether the recycling may be worthwhile despite unfavorable market costs. Alternatively, legal means (such as a carbon tax) can be used to bring externalities into the market, so that the market cost of the material becomes close to the true cost.

Apartment buildings often have dust flumes in which residents can dispose of their waste in stainless steel waste containers. These chutes usually lead to some large receptacle or waste-disposal complex in the basement.

In some U.S. states, a program called RecycleBank pays people to recycle, receiving money from local municipalities for the reduction in landfill space which must be purchased. It uses a single stream process in which all material is automatically sorted.

 

Home | History | Product Concept | Benefits | Target Market | Characteristics | Specifications
Clients | Distributors | Products |  Contact Us | Grants | News | Site Plan | Français